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Events

Small CS: A shoestring approach to content strategy

Yes, you can start small, very small. With a strategy for your nano-content.

“There are hundreds of things that you can do with your website if you break things down. Those big examples – NPR, Boston Globe, Marriott – these are awesome examples for understanding the complexity in content strategy. They’re fantastic for seeing how big things can get.But we can make things smaller as well. And, I want to be really clear—I know somebody that works with Marriott. They have the same internal issues that any small business does. Everybody has some kind of content issue that makes it hard to get stuff done. We all have that. The big companies, the small companies. Large universities, small universities. Non-profit, for profit.”

Cory Vilhauer a.k.a. /mrvilhauer | @mrvilhauer ~ Eating Elephant

Architecting happiness

Bravo! Such a nice initiative to bring the design challenge to our community. Great starting point for #WIAD15 and #ArchHappy.

“The world is complex. Information is subjective. Customer Experience is key. Globally there is a big community of courageous professionals for whom their daily work is about making sense of any mess. They are information architects, user experience designers, developers, social media experts, visual designers, innovators… sometimes working as specialists but in other roles too: as creative directors, entrepreneurs, managers or consultants. They are to be found in agencies, startups, big corporations or work as freelancers. They all have something in common: they are responsible for Designing, Developing, Building, Communicating webs, mobile apps or digital services and products that act as information spaces in ubiquitous ecologies (on any device, in any location, and in any format). The aim of this project is to stimulate discussion about how we Architect for Happiness.”

(Silvia Calvet a.k.a. @silviacalvet and Nicole Neuefeind a.k.a. @nicneuvision ~ About Architecting Happiness)

The architecture of human experience

Everything with a structure has an architecture, human experiences not excluded.

“The built environment is the ultimate platform for human experience. No matter which social network we frequent or which software we use, we are all logging on from real, physical space – our house, our office, our favorite café or pub, or local park. In a world where up to 70% of the global population will soon live in cities, one might say that architects operate on the front lines of experiential design. Learn how architects are using design tools and back-to-basics observation to better understand the mechanics of human behavior and the qualitative value people ascribe to the experience of daily life. Discover how quick access to information and interdisciplinary collaboration is affecting the shape of building design and the patterns of city planning. See how people use and occupy space – and hear why they come back. View the world from the perspective of one profession that is designing it.”

(David Cutler a.k.a. @davidcutler_sea ~ Adaptive Path UX Week 2014)

Brand experience: There’s no app for that

Challenging the UX way of thinking from a marketing and branding perspective.

“In his opening keynote Thomas Marzano challenges the HCI community to think about Brand Experience instead of User Experience. Tapping from his experience with the new Philips Brand, he will demonstrate us how a company should approach its brand in a holistic way and thus create a better and deeper felt brand differentiation. Thomas firmly believes that putting people at the centre of imagination is the only sustainable way of creating meaningful experiences.”

(Thomas Marzano a.k.a. @ThomasMarzano ~ Chi Sparks 2014 videos)

Social enterprise by design

Great to see Milans work of the INTERSECTION Conference 2014 in moving images.

“Traditional organizations around the world are now beginning the intentional effort to re-design themselves en masse for the contemporary digital world. Transformative technologies such as social media, digital ecosystems, and community-powered processes are often driving these changes. But smart organizational design, open and community-based process re-engineering, and careful cultivation of network capital is required to deliver meaningful results. The data now seems to show that the major challenge of making the transition to next-generation business in the current stage of industry maturity is a lack of balance between the sizes, motivations, and interests of employees, business parnters, customers, and the marketplace. Fortunately, it’s also clear that this situation doesn’t have to exist. Organizations that pro-actively re-design their structures and processes at scale are beginning to distinguish themselves from their peers in terms of real business performance. To see how to make the transition, we can explore how organizations can achieve these results today.”

(Dion Hinchcliffe a.k.a. @dhinchcliffe ~ The INTERSECTION14 videos)

All papers from the Service Design and Innovation Conference 2014

Lots of paper gems from this upcoming design field.

“ServDes.2014 focused on how Service Design is contributing to ‘Service Futures’ and how it is developing as a field of research and practice. The conference considered how the concept and role of services have been developing in the recent decades and questioned how Service Design is evolving following a similar path. Starting from its initial focus on service interactions and experiences, Service Design research and practice have entered more strategic and transformational roles, dealing with issues of organisational change, system design, sustainability and social change, amongst others. The concept and applications of this design field is also expanding and required some collective considerations. The conference attracted 175 participants from 24 nationalities, of which 60 percent were academics and 40 percent were practitioners.”

(Service Design and Innovation Conference)

At the INTERSECTION of design thinking and systems thinking

Great to be part of this emergent topic and community. More to follow, that’s for sure.

A trip report from a cross-disciplinary event ~ “Last month, I attended an event on what hopefully will become a new community of knowledge and practice: strategic enterprise design. At INTERSECTION (Paris, 16-17 April 2014), the communities of experience design and enterprise architecture and design hooked up, each with their own views, opinions and insights on the enterprise of the future. The conference was a cross-disciplinary encounter of communities, previously hardly aware of each others existence. And as they say, the most interesting things happen around the edges.”

(Peter Bogaards ~ BiRDS on a W!RE)

The customer experience obsession

Obsessed with customers, always good?

“Customer Experience is now accepted as a key driver for business growth, regardless of industry. This view is supported by research showing that customer experience leaders have significantly, consistently out-performed the S&P 500 in recent years — but understanding the value of customer experience and transcending engrained organizational processes that hinder it are different matters. Digital strategy has unleashed new, creative ways to engage customers throughout every step of their journey; it’s now time to consider the strategic role community plays in harnessing the value of digital interactions to inform long-term customer relationship and loyalty goals.”

(Wendy Lea a.k.a. @WendySLea ~ Adaptive Path‘s Managing Experience Conference 2014)

When Service Design meets the divided company

A focus of service design on the service experience makes it the brother or sister of UX and CX in the Experience Design family.

“What happens when a service design project meets a hierarchical, divided company? You can design an amazing service, and yet at the end of the day, the organizations still has to deliver. A service design project that ignores organizational readiness is doomed to fail. How to move service projects forward in the face of such constraints? Service design usually means a change initiative. More than half of change initiatives fail to achieve their objectives. Most of these initiatives fail because they don’t adequately understand the organization’s culture and potential for resisting the change.”

(Dave Gray a.k.a. @davegray ~ Adaptive Path’s The Service Experience Conference 2013)

The seduction of semantics and the third wave

Only the discourse will bring our field forward. Not the table tennis of opinions.

“If there’s a third wave, a new spirit, a , it’s because we can build on 20 years of continuous practice and research and some 40 years of framing a common problem space. We are as much moving on as we are bringing it all back home: it’d be great if we could do that without paying too much attention to the sirens of unnecessary semantics. It’s a waste of time and we have a ton of work to do.”

(Andreas Resmini a.k.a. @resmini)

Proceedings of Chi Sparks 2014: Creating the difference

Proud to have contributed to at least one of the papers.

“At the Chi Sparks 2014 conference, researchers and practitioners in the HCI community convene to share and discuss their efforts on researching and developing methods, techniques, products, and services that enable people to have better interactions with systems and other people. The conference is hosted at The Hague University of Applied Sciences, and proudly built upon the previous conferences in Arnhem (2011) and Leiden (2009).”

(Chi Sparks 2014 ~ April 3, 2014)

Information Architecture Summit 2014 Closing Plenary

Always a pleasure to read a deep mind.

“We can struggle to create a positive vision for the future as individuals, organizations, and societies. We’re in the midst of an in between stage of liminality. We’re on the threshold of sustainability or collapse. To thrive, we will need to change culture. It won’t be fast, but a little change can add up. It won’t be easy, but there’s no other way. And I know this community will contribute, because it’s all about connecting the dots…”

(Peter Morville a.k.a. @morville)

Languaging reality, dialogue and interaction

Language, the most important instrument to communicate, interact and view the world.

“In his keynote, Klaus will distinguish four theories from the philosophy of language and elaborate on dialogical conceptions of how reality comes to be constructed. To him, languaging – the process of conversing in language – is a creative and fundamentally socio-cultural practice. Language does not merely describe, it creates realities in conversations and actions. Dialogical conceptions raise doubts in several common epistemological assumptions. Questioning them could open possibilities of seeing interaction design in a new way.”

(Klaus Krippendorff ~ Interaction14 videos)

Living service worlds

Design for open systems is a major wicked problem.

“The living nature of digital services means that designers can’t design a service experience. They can only design the resources for people to bring the experience to life for themselves. Designers create affordances that help people know where to start, what to do and when to do it. Services come to life through people: how they read the resources, their personal history and their context. Shelley Evenson and Tom Schneider see two trends placing new demands on designing for service. The first is what they call living services—the meteoric rise of mobile, embedded sensors and more natural interfaces. The second, just starting to appear as a broader global trend, is described in the book The Intention Economy – the shift from sellers finding buyers to buyers finding sellers. In this video, Evenson and Schneider describe how they think these trends will influence designing for living services.”

(Shelley Evenson and Tom Schneider ~ Videos from the 2013 AIGA Design Conference)

Quantifying customer experience

Changing from UX design to CX design, just like that.

“Customer experience stretches far to either side of any interaction that can be influenced by UX interface design. Customer experience starts from when a customer first hears about what your product or service is promising, gets cemented by how well you deliver on that promise (through UI and well beyond), and gets broadcast in social media to influence the impressions of future customers. As such, it’s important to have a way to quantify the effects of the customer experience improvement that stretch beyond Google Analytics and screen attention heat mapping.”

(CX design 2013)

The Service Design imperative

Great collection of content when you haven’t attend the event in Cardiff.

“Service Design is the application of design practice to the other 80% of the economy. It demands new skills, tools and techniques, perhaps even a rethinking of what we mean by design itself. Designing product service systems and the business models that enable them, means crossing boundaries between design disciplines, business and technology. It means changing the processes and practices not only of designers but how firms innovate and organize themselves. This isn’t easy as we share different working practices and cultures, but, it’s essential, for service designers, if we are to collaborate or even lead innovation. Innovative service systems can create rich and integrated customer experiences — delivering real social and economic value, opportunities for self-expression, and bring meaning to peoples’ lives, as well as to the world we share.”

(Service Design Network 2013 conference videos and presentations)

Embedding design thinking in business and making money

Love the suggestion that designers should wear suites in order to make a dent in the business world.

“Ask a designer what their toughest challenge is and many will say its being asked by clients to justify a business case, or return on financial investment in design, before anything has been designed.”

(Tom Banks ~ DesignWeek)

Brenda Laurel delivered keynote at UX Week 2013

Always delivers great thoughts in the theatre.

“Brenda Laurel has worked in interactive media since 1976. She currently serves as an adjunct professor in Computer Science Department at U. C. Santa Cruz. She served as professor and founding chair of the Graduate Program in Design at California College of Arts from 2006 to 2012. She designed and chaired the graduate Media Design Program at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena (2001-2006) and was a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems Labs (2005-2006). Based on her research in gender and technology at Interval Research (1992-1996), she co-founded Purple Moon in 1996 to create interactive media for girls. In 1990 she co-founded Telepresence Research, Inc., focusing on virtual reality and remote presence. Other employers include Atari, Activision, and Apple. Her books include The Art of Human-Computer Interface Design(1990), Computers as Theatre(1991), Utopian Entrepreneur (2001), and Design Research: Methods and Perspectives (2004). Her most recent writing, Gaian IXD, was the cover article in the Sep-Oct 2011 issue of the journal Interactions. She earned her BA (1972) from DePauw University and her MFA (1975) and PhD. in Theatre (1986) from the Ohio State University.”

(Brenda Laurel a.k.a. @blaurel ~ UX Week 2013)

Six ways ecosystems have changed our roles and the way we work

Design not only an agent of change, but design itself is changing all the time.

“Smart companies no longer just ‘sell product’ – they build ecosystems of genuine value, comprised of dynamic, interconnected touch points that stoke customer interests and support their needs. Customer experience becomes an essential business strategy. In the midst of this shift, where lagging businesses struggle to follow suit, our role as UX professionals is evolving and forcing us to work differently.”

(Cindy Chastain a.k.a. @cchastain ~ MX Conference 2013)